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Overnight and seasonality effects or analysis of sentiment are favorite themes in quantitative academic research. Novel and very recent research from Baoqing Gan, Vitali Alexeev, and Danny Yeung (August 2022) presents us with an opportunity to discover new findings related to both these phenomena. The main takeaway is that the accumulated sentiment from the overnight non-trading period can predict the next period’s intraday stock return.

https://quantpedia.com/overnight-sentiment-and-the-intraday-return-dynamics/

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Trading on non-public information has been very profitable in the past (and probably still is). Prominent insiders use their knowledge and share it with influential, wealthy institutional investors who earn money in an illegal way. And especially, options provide attractive leverage and relatively viable ways to “hide” sources of this illegal advantage. But after several big scandals, the resurgence of some forms of insider trading was stopped in 2009 after a trial with hedge fund superstar Raj Rajaratnam. The question is: What is the situation now?

https://quantpedia.com/how-common-is-insider-trading-evidence-from-the-options-market/

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Investing has been a reliable way to compound one’s inheritance over ages known throughout human history. But different monetary and fiscal situations, especially during times of uncertainty and extreme stress, force both individuals and institutions to adjust their financial habits. A recent research paper written by Guido Baltussen, Laurens Swinkels, and Pim van Vliet analyzed large samples of data starting from the 19th century and brought unique perspectives on how various asset classes perform during “quiet, good” periods and, on the other side, economic turmoil. Research summarized very actual topics of investing during those different cycles and what inflation does to returns across equities, bonds, and cash.

https://quantpedia.com/investing-in-deflation-inflation-and-stagflation-regimes/

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Our mission here at Quantpedia is to provide both retail and institutional investors with ideas for trading strategies that are easily understandable while based on and backed by quantitative academic research. Today, we present you with the results from a study that we came across. Although it’s not quantitative, but qualitative, it has really held our interest. The paper does not provide any images or figures; it is a study made from various types of surveys with answers from professionals concluded with an attention-grabbing summary table.

https://quantpedia.com/a-study-on-how-algorithmic-traders-earn-money/

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Have you ever wondered if your trading asset trends or mean-reverts? Everyone involved in trading or investments daily solves the task of — What trading strategy should I apply to my assets to generate profits? As always, we at Quantpedia will try to help you a bit with this never-ending task with our new tool/report, which will be unveiled next week for all Quantpedia Pro subscribers. The following article serves as an introduction to the methodology we will use to find new trading edges for you automatically.

https://quantpedia.com/automated-trading-edge-analysis/

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At the moment, there is a lot of attention surrounding overnight anomalies in various types of financial markets. While such effects have been well documented in research, especially in US equities and derivatives, there are other asset classes that are not as well addressed. A recent (2022) paper from Jiang, Luo, and Ye contributed appealing evidence in favor of validating these phenomena in the Chinese market. We highlight the finding that the market MKT factor beta premiums are earned exclusively overnight and tend to reverse intraday (and in smaller potency also value HML and profitability RMW), which is the same finding as for the US equities. In contrast, the size SMB factor exhibit significantly opposite patterns: positive intraday premiums and negative overnight premiums (and the investment CMA factor).

https://quantpedia.com/are-there-intraday-and-overnight-seasonality-effects-in-china/

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Over the last few years, we may have noticed a significant growth in retail investing. No surprise, the COVID pandemic outbreak increased the numbers even more, and undoubtedly, options trading is no exception. According to the authors (de Silva, Smith, Co), retail traders seek options expecting spikes in volatility and, for that reason, incline toward firms with more media coverage. Furthermore, their trading increases around the time of firms’ earnings announcements. As a result, market makers benefit from the behavior mentioned above, which causes a large flow of money from retail to market makers.

https://quantpedia.com/how-retail-losses-money-in-option-trading/

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